Alumni

 


Arjun Sethi

Arjun_Sethi

Email: A.Sethi@bsms.ac.uk

I am a post-doctoral research associate in the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, working on a project investigating emotion processing in conduct problems using fMRI. I am particularly interested in the neurobiological basis of callous-unemotional traits, and in better describing emotional dysfunction in conduct disorder populations that may put individuals at risk of developing psychopathy in adulthood. My work in the Forensic & Neurodevelopmental Sciences Department at the Institute of Psychiatry focused on using diffusion MRI tractography to examine networks underpinning affective and unempathic symptoms in both childhood and adulthood antisocial disorders. My PhD work at Brighton & Sussex Medical School used multi-modal MR analyses and computational modelling of reinforcement learning to examine the anatomy and function of mesolimbic and nigrostriatal systems in ADHD, and how these are therapeutically targeted by dopaminergic medications.

 

Iakovina Koutoufa

Iakovina_Koutoufa

 Email: iakovina.koutoufa.10@ucl.ac.uk

I joined the DRRU in early 2015, working on a project that investigates the effects of early adversity on later cognitive and emotional functioning, with particular focus on autobiographical memory using behavioural and neuroimaging data. I am particularly interested in investigating the mechanisms of clinical interventions using neuroimaging techniques. I graduated from the DRRU in June 2017 to start my training as a Clinical Psychologist at Royal Holloway University of London.

Harriet Phillips

Harriet_Phillips

Email: hcp28@bath.ac.uk

I joined the DRRU in June 2016 to undertake the placement year of my BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath. I worked as an Honorary Research Assistant on the Brains and Behaviour project, investigating how children with a variety of behavioural problems process emotion, using both fMRI and behavioural measures. My personal interests refer to how the neural pathways of the brain are accountable for differences in registering emotion. I am particularly interested in investigating empathy and psychopathy in terms of neural activity and how their development can be influenced by certain risk factors. I am also interested in the application of neuroscience to the clinical field, specifically in terms of psychopathology. I am now starting the final year of my Undergraduate back at Bath and hope to return to the DRRU in the future.

 

Matthew Constantinou

Matthew_Constantinou

Email: matthew.constantinou.13@ucl.ac.uk

I joined the DRRU (Feb 2016) to complete one of three lab placements for the 4-year MRC PhD in Mental Health. I am working on a project investigating the structural correlates of parenting experience in a community sample of young adolescents, and how this relates to social, emotional, and behavioural adjustment. More generally, I am interested in attachment and the development and treatment of difficulties associated with complex trauma.

 

Nicole De Lima

Nicole_DeLima

I joined the DRRU in September 2015 as part of a year-long placement where I am working on a project investigating emotional processing in children with behavioural issues using fMRI. I am currently in the penultimate year of my BSc Psychology with Professional Placement from Cardiff University. I am interested in the use of neuroimaging techniques to explore the development of neural pathways in the brain.

 

Ana Seara-Cardoso

Ana_Cardoso

E-mail: ana.cardoso.09@ucl.ac.uk

I am a postdoctoral research fellow based in the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit and in the Neuropsychophysiology Lab (CIPsi, Universidade do Minho, Portugal). My research focuses on the study of the neurobiology of empathy, morality and antisocial behaviour. In particular, I am keen to understand how individual variability in neural correlates of empathic and moral processing are reflected in individual differences in psychopathic personality traits and antisocial behaviour.

Rachael Lickley

Rachael_Lickley

Email: rachael.lickley.2011@live.rhul.ac.uk

I joined the DRRU as a research assistant in 2014 after completing my BSc in Psychology at Royal Holloway earlier that year. I worked on two projects within the DRRU, both of which used fMRI and behavioural measures. The first explored emotional processing in children with behavioural problems and the second investigated how early adversity may affect later emotional functioning, in terms of both resilience to early adversity and potential markers of psychiatric disorders. I left the DRRU in 2016 to begin a PhD at Royal Holloway. I am interested in the development of emotion regulation in adolescents, particularly the development of the neural underpinnings of reactive aggression and the individual differences in the ability to regulate frustration. (http://www.pc.rhul.ac.uk/sites/edbl/).

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Liz O’Nions

Liz_O'nions

Email: e.o’nions@ucl.ac.uk

I worked as a post-doc in the lab on an MRC funded brain imaging study examining the neurocognitive underpinnings of conduct problems (2013-2016). I am now beginning a fellowship at the Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, Belgium.  Prior to this, I worked at the Institute of Psychiatry on a project investigating autism and Pathological Demand Avoidance. My main area of interest is understanding the range of behavioural profiles that can occur in individuals with conduct or behavioural problems, and getting to the route of the cognitive mechanisms that drive these difficulties.

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Jean-Baptiste Pingault

JeanBaptise_Pingault

Email: pingaultjb@yahoo.fr

After a first four-year post-doctorate at the University of Montreal, I am currently a Marie Curie post-doctoral research fellow based jointly at UCL and Kings College London, working with Professor Essi Viding and Professor Robert Plomin.
My research focuses on the development of antisocial behaviour from early childhood to adulthood. I am interested in 1) identifying the early environmental risk-factors and the long-term outcomes associated with the development of antisocial behaviour and impulsivity/hyperactivity; 2) adopting a longitudinal behavioural genetics approach to disentangle the independent and/or interactive contributions of genes and the environment to the development of these behaviours. Regarding methodology, I am particularly interested in statistical techniques and study designs aiming to strengthen causal inferences.

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Philip Kelly

Philip_Kelly

Email: philip.kelly.09@ucl.ac.uk

I was a PhD student funded by The Anna Freud Centre and UCL under the Impact Award scheme. Supervised by Dr Eamon McCrory and Prof. Essi Viding, my PhD aimed to further our understanding of the impact of childhood maltreatment on brain structure and function. More specifically I explored how childhood abuse may affect distinct cortical indices (such as cortical thickness) using novel neuroimaging analysis techniques. I also plan to investigate neural connectivity and possible neural biomarkers that may predict later cognitive or behavioural functioning.

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Lucy Foulkes

Lucy_Foulkes

Email: l.foulkes@ucl.ac.uk

I completed my PhD with Essi and Eamon in 2011-2015, during which I investigated associations between social reward and antisocial behaviour in adults and adolescents. I am now working as a postdoctoral Research Associate at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience (ICN). In this role, I am working with Prof Sarah-Jayne Blakemore on a grant that investigates the impact of teaching mindfulness to adolescents. For more information about this project, please visit http://www.oxfordmindfulness.org/learn/myriad/.

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Patricia Lockwood

Patricia_Lockwood

Email: p.lockwood@ucl.ac.uk

I am currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford. I am investigating the behavioural and neural basis of social cognition in healthy individuals and in individuals with brain lesions. In particular, I am interested in the mechanisms that can link empathy to social behaviour and in using neuroimaging techniques to identify relationships between specific brain lesions and changes in social cognition and behaviour. Previously, I was an MRC funded PhD student in the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit. During my PhD I used a multimodal approach of behavioural paradigms, computational modelling and fMRI to investigate individual differences in empathic/vicarious processing in healthy adults and in children with conduct problems.

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Amy Palmer

Amy_Palmer

Email: amy.palmer@ucl.ac.uk

I was a post-doctoral research associate in the Developmental Risk and
Resilience Unit, studying how early life adversity
affects psychological development. I employed a combination
of structural and functional brain imaging tools as well as
behavioural measures to assess what factors lead to the emergence of
different psychopathological outcomes in adolescence. I am
particularly interested in how behaviour is affected by an
individual’s perception of situational cues in the environment.
Because the perception of the present is crucially dependent on past
experience with similar situations, behaviour is tied to personal
history. My goal is to better understand psychopathology and behaviour
in youths who have experienced maltreatment by investigating how their
past affects processing of the present.

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Kate Wolfe

Kate_Wolfe

Email: k.wolfe@ucl.ac.uk

I was a first year student on the Medical Research Council funded PhD in Mental Health. I undertook a placement at the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, one of three placements which I have selected for the first year of my studies. My placement involved assisting with recruitment on a longitudinal project aiming to elucidate the neurocognitive correlates of risk and resilience following early adversity.

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Jeffrey Henry

Jeffrey_Henry

Email: jeffrey.henry.2@ulaval.ca

I am a third year PhD student at Université Laval (Québec, Canada) funded by the Fonds Québécois de Recherche sur la Société et la Culture. Supervised by Prof. Michel Boivin and Prof. Ginette Dionne, my PhD aims to document early genotype-environment transactions underlying the development of callous-unemotional traits in childhood and adolescence. I benefit from a large, normative twin sample (Étude des Jumeaux Nouveau-nés du Québec; ÉJNQ) in exploring how child genetic liability to callous-unemotional traits moderate longitudinal-developmental associations between early adversity and subsequent levels of callous-unemotional traits. As an intern at the DRRU, I use data from the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS) to document etiological overlap and independence between dimensions of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits (ICU; Frick et al., 2003). I was supervised by Prof. Essi Viding and work in close collaboration with Dr. Jean-Baptiste Pingault, research fellow at the DRRU.

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Cathy Davies

Cathy_Davis

Email: cathy.davies@kcl.ac.uk

I am currently an MRC funded PhD student in the Department of Psychosis Studies at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. My research uses multimodal neuroimaging and pharmacological challenge to investigate the mechanisms underlying symptoms of psychosis in those at high risk. Previously, I was a research assistant at the DRRU working on a longitudinal fMRI study of childhood adversity and its effects on autobiographical memory and emotional processing.

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Sophie-Marie Reader

Sophie_Reader

Email: sophie.raeder@new.ox.ac.uk

I was a part-time research assistant at the DRRU, working on a series of studies investigating the risk factors involved in the development of behavioural difficulties in adolescents. I am now completing a PhD at the University of Oxford, examining attentional patterns to emotional information in anxious individuals.

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Marine Buon

Marine_Buon

Email: m.buon@ucl.ac.uk

I was a postdoctoral fellow funded by the French foundation “Fondation Fyssen” and supervised by Professor Essi Viding. My field of investigation concerns the role of emotional and non-emotional processes in the development of typical and atypical moral cognition in teenagers. Using behavioural studies I tried to understand how processes such as theory of mind, empathic responses and controlled resources lead teenagers to generate (im)mature moral judgments and to behave in a moral way, or not. Prior to this, I worked  at the Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et de Psycholinguistique, at theEcole Normale Supérieure in Paris, with Emmanuel Dupoux, investigating the nature of moral competences in infants, preschoolers, adults and individuals with autism.   I’m currently a lecturer in developmental psychology at Paul Valery University (Montpellier, France) where I continue to explore developmentaly the cognitive basis of typical and atypical moral cognition.

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Sophie Samuel

Sophie_Samuel

Email: sophie.samuel@ucl.ac.uk

During my time at DRRU I have worked on two research projects relating to childhood resilience and the impact of child maltreatment on brain structure and function. I have particular interest in trauma and post-traumatic growth. I currently work at the charity Switchback managing a team of Switchback Mentors who work intensively with young men in prison and on release, aged 18-24yrs, to support them to make long-lasting meaningful change. I also work as a psychotherapist both privately and for the domestic violence charity Woman’s Trust.

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Charlotte Cecil

Charlotte_Cecil

Email: charlotte.cecil@ucl.ac.uk

In 2013, I completed a PhD at the DRRU, where I examined the impact of severe developmental adversity (e.g. child maltreatment, witnessing domestic violence, community violence exposure) on young people’s emotional and behavioural functioning. Through this work, I became increasingly interested in how early experiences ‘get under the skin’ to influence developmental and mental health. To this end, I worked for two years as a postdoc in the Developmental Psychopathology Lab (IoPPN, KCL), investigating whether epigenetic mechanisms mediate the effect of pre- and postnatal risks on the emergence of externalizing problems. Currently, I have been awarded a three-year fellowship (ESRC Future Research Leaders scheme) aimed a elucidating the epigenetic basis of psychiatric comorbidity, making use of genome-wide, system-level and candidate gene analytic strategies.

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Laura Finlayson

Laura_Finlayson

Email: Laurafinlayson4@gmail.com

I am currently undertaking a Master of Biomedical Science at the University of Melbourne. I am carrying out the research component of the degree jointly through the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre and Orygen Youth Health. My research focuses on the neural correlates of self-referential processing in Borderline PersonalityDisorder, which is part of a broader MRI-based study on the relationship betweenstress and BPD.

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Chloe Thompson-Booth

Chloe_thompson_booth

Email: chloe.booth.09@ucl.ac.uk

I am currently a trainee clinical psychologist enrolled on the DClinPsy programme at UCL. I completed my ESRC funded PhD at the DRRU in 2013 under the supervision of Dr. Eamon McCrory and Prof. Essi Viding. During my PhD, my research focused on attention to infant and child emotional faces in mothers and fathers as compared to non-parents. I also investigated how attention to infant faces was affected by current parental stress and the experience of childhood maltreatment.

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Helena Rutherford, PhD

Helena_Rutherford

E-mail : helena.rutherford@yale.edu 

I am a post-doctoral fellow based here at UCL and also at Yale Child Study Center . My research interests centre round emotion perception and emotion regulation in adults and children. I employ both behavioural and neurophysiological measures to explore these issues. An important focus of my current program of research is to explore the neural circuitry of parenting behaviour. As a starting point, we hope to understand how parents regulate their emotions and the consequences of this for parent-child interactions.

In addition to my research, I am also an Academic Tutor for the  Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology MSc  program at UCL and Yale.

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Stephane De Brito, PhD

Stephane_De_Brito

Email: s.a.debrito@bham.ac.uk

Research

In March 2012 I joined the School of Psychology at the University of Birmingham as an Independent Research Fellow. Between 2009 and 2012 I was a post-doctoral research associate in the Developmental Risk & Resilience Unit. My research is interdisciplinary, combining behavioural, neurocognitive and magnetic resonance brain imaging techniques to better understand the characteristics of different subgroups of children and adults displaying severe antisocial behaviour and callous-unemotional traits. Another strand of my research is to better understand patterns of resilience and vulnerability in children and adults who have experienced maltreatment. For more information and contact details, click here.

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Catherine Sebastian

Catherine_Sebastian

Email: Catherine.Sebastian@rhul.ac.uk

I am currently a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at Royal Holloway University of London, where I have worked since leaving the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit in 2012. My research focuses on the development of social and emotional processing during adolescence. In particular, I am interested in how young people learn to regulate or control their emotions, and how this relates to socioemotional wellbeing and mental health. I have worked with typically developing adolescents as well as those with autism spectrum conditions and conduct problems. I use a variety of research methods from cognitive neuroscience and developmental psychology, including functional and structural neuroimaging, cognitive testing, and questionnaires. For more information and contact details, click here.

For more information about Dr Sebastian’s lab click here.

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Caroline Bradley

Caroline_Bradley

Email: caroline.bradley@ucl.ac.uk

 I am a part-time research assistant at the DRRU, supporting a variety of projects in the department and helping with the day to day running of the lab. I have previously worked as an Honorary Assistant Psychologist in Islington Memory Service running Cognitive Stimulation Therapy groups for older adults with dementia and their carers.

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Zoe Hyde

Zoe_Hyde

Email: z.hyde@ucl.ac.uk

I am currently undertaking a Clinical Psychology course at Kings College London.

I was a research assistant at the Development Risk and Resilience Unit at UCL. I was working on a study that investigated neurocognitive correlates of antisocial behaviour in children using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and experimental tasks to examine empathy, and emotional processing and regulation. Our aim was to gain a greater understanding of the functional brain networks that may underlie subtypes of antisocial behaviour, in the hope that this research can help to inform future intervention strategies with these children.

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Nathalie Fontaine, PhD

Nathalie_Fontaine

Email: nathalie.fontaine@umontreal.ca

I am an Associate Professor at the School of Criminology, Université de Montréal. My research focuses on the development of antisocial behaviour in youth, with special attention to callous-unemotional traits (e.g., lack of guilt and empathy, and shallow emotions), as well as to risk and protective factors related to these behavioural problems. I combine longitudinal data, experimental research, twin model-fitting approaches, and neuroscience techniques to study different developmental pathways to antisocial behaviour. I was a post-doctoral research fellow at the DRRU during 2007-2008.

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Alice Jones

Alice_Jones

Email: a.jones@gold.ac.uk

Since 2011, I have been the Head of the Unit of School and Family Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. My research is inter-disciplinary, combining neuroimaging, behavioural genetics and neuropsychology to best understand behavioural difficulties in children, particularly those difficulties that interfere with a child’s ability to get on in school. I am particularly interested in the cognitive and affective correlates of aggressive and disruptive behaviours, and have focused on understanding empathic and emotion understanding and regulation abilities.

Most recently, I have been working with Educational Psychologists and teachers to develop and evaluate interventions for children with chronic and severe behavioural and emotional difficulties.

PhD student July 2005 – August 2009.

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Sara Hodsoll, PhD

Sara_Hodsoll

E-mail: s.n.clarke@ucl.ac.uk

I completed my ESRC funded PhD at UCL in September 2010 under the supervision of Prof. Essi Viding and Prof. Nilli Lavie. My research investigated attention to emotional faces, specifically, whether task-irrelevant facial expressions of emotion are able to capture attention. As well as establishing the basic phenomena associated with this emotional capture, my research also investigated how individual differences in psychopathic traits (in both adults and children) affect attention to emotional faces. I am currently a trainee clinical psychologist, enrolled on the DClinPsy doctoral programme at UCL, and I plan to continue my research into attention and emotion processing in individuals with psychopathic traits at DRRU.

PhD Student September 2007 – September 2010.

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Helen Maris

Helen_Maris

Email: helenmaris@hotmail.com

Previously, I worked as a Research Assistant at UCL’s Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit and at The Anna Freud Centre. I was involved in an ESRC-funded project investigating patterns of resilience and vulnerability in children with a history of maltreatment and early adversity; focusing on affective, behavioural and neurobiological factors. More broadly, I am interested in the factors that influence children’s social, emotional and neurobiological development.

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Henrik Larsson

Henrik_Larsson

E-mail: henrik.larsson@ki.se

I am currently Professor of psychiatric epidemiology at Örebro University and Karolinska Institute. My research group has strong skills in advanced epidemiological analyses and uses the unique possibilities in Sweden to perform psychiatric epidemiological research based on national health registers, twin research using the Swedish twin register and molecular epidemiology using large scale data collections of DNA.

Post-doctoral research fellow January – December 2006.

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Thomas Villemonteix

Thomas_Villemonteix

Email: t.villemonteix@gmail.com

MSc. student at Ecole Normale Superieure de la Rue d’Ulm.I conducted my dissertation project under the joint supervision of Franck Ramus at the Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique and Dr. Eamon McCrory at the Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit.
For my dissertation I investigated attentional biases to threat in a population of maltreated children. More generally, my research interests include developmental psychopathology, the evaluation of psychotherapies and the history of psychology.

MSc Student February – June 2011.

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Daniel Busso

Dan_Busso

Email: daniel.busso@mail.harvard.edu

I am currently a Doctoral student at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education. Broadly, my research interests concern the longitudinal effects of adversity and trauma in early childhood. I am especially interested in translational research, particularly within the school, that can be leveraged to substantively improve life outcomes for children who are vulnerable or ‘at-risk’. Prior to this, received my Master’s degree from UCL. For my Master’s thesis, supervised by Dr. Eamon McCrory, I investigated the neural correlates of resilience in adolescence, using structural imaging methods.

MSc Student – June 2011.

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